A Leauki's Writings
Published on June 14, 2009 By Leauki In Democrat

It should come as no surprise that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a Republican. In that era, almost all black Americans were Republicans. Why? From its founding in 1854 as the anti-slavery party until today, the Republican Party has championed freedom and civil rights for blacks. And as one pundit so succinctly stated, the Democrat Party is as it always has been, the party of the four S's: slavery, secession, segregation and now socialism.

...

Democrat President John F. Kennedy is lauded as a proponent of civil rights. However, Kennedy voted against the 1957 Civil Rights Act while he was a senator, as did Democrat Sen. Al Gore Sr. And after he became President, Kennedy was opposed to the 1963 March on Washington by Dr. King that was organized by A. Phillip Randolph, who was a black Republican. President Kennedy, through his brother Atty. Gen. Robert Kennedy, had Dr. King wiretapped and investigated by the FBI on suspicion of being a Communist in order to undermine Dr. King.

...

Another former "Dixiecrat" is former Democrat Sen. Ernest Hollings, who put up the Confederate flag over the state Capitol when he was the governor of South Carolina. There was no public outcry when Democrat Sen. Christopher Dodd praised Byrd as someone who would have been "a great senator for any moment," including the Civil War. Yet Democrats denounced then-Senate GOP leader Trent Lott for his remarks about Sen. Strom Thurmond (R.-S.C.). Thurmond was never in the Ku Klux Klan and defended blacks against lynching and the discriminatory poll taxes imposed on blacks by Democrats. 

...

Democrats have been running our inner-cities for the past 30 to 40 years, and blacks are still complaining about the same problems. More than $7 trillion dollars have been spent on poverty programs since Lyndon Johnson's War on Poverty with little, if any, impact on poverty. Diabolically, every election cycle, Democrats blame Republicans for the deplorable conditions in the inner-cities, then incite blacks to cast a protest vote against Republicans.

http://www.humanevents.com/article.php?id=16500


Comments
on Jun 14, 2009

...

on Jun 14, 2009

Democrats must hire the best PR people ever. They really have minorities believing the crumbs they hand out translates into care and empathy, while they, for the most part, turn their backs on real self-sufficiency, though the later is the harder path. It really saddens me as people will never be perceived as equal until they are equally responsible for all of our futures.

on Jun 14, 2009

It should come as no surprise that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was a Republican. In that era, almost all black Americans were Republicans.

It's a nice article, however..... it's a lie! Martin Luther King was not a member of the Republican Party. In fact, it was the black vote that secured JFK getting into office and the year before MLK was murdered, there was serious talk afoot of Dr King running against Johnson for the democratic nomination.

ssoooooo.... yeah.

Nevermind that he was involved with organizations like the NAACP which never, ever got along very well with the republicans to boot!

on Jun 14, 2009

t's a nice article, however..... it's a lie! Martin Luther King was not a member of the Republican Party.

His father was.

And the article doesn't say that MLK was a party member, just that he was a "Republican", which I read "supporter of the Republican party".

The NAACP never ever got along very well the Republicans? Really?

 

on Jun 15, 2009

1. First off, the Republican party as it was founded in 1854 is radically different than it was in MLK Jr's time, way different.

 

2. "There must be a better distribution of wealth, and maybe America must move toward a democratic socialism." ~MLK ( Franklin, Robert Michael (1990). Liberating Visions: Human Fulfillment and Social Justice in African-American Thought. Fortress Press. pp. 125. )

That doesn't sound like a republican, even at that time.

3. I'm actually reading his autobiogaphy, and it states about the '64 GOP convention (in his own words), "frenzied wedding ... of the KKK and the radical right."

 

4. MLK, according to his words and that of his son - voted for Kennedy, and LBJ.

 

5. It is unlikely that MLK was a republican, especially during the '64 election due to Goldwater's opposition to federal civil rights laws.

 

Etc.

on Jun 15, 2009

Alderic,

Did you even read the article I linked to? It addresses those very points.

 

on Jun 15, 2009

Alderic,

Did you even read the article I linked to? It addresses those very points.

 

*shrugs* I was just adding my two cents to the fact that he wasn't a Republican.

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