A Leauki's Writings
A letter my friend Mohamed sent me
Published on June 4, 2009 By Leauki In War on Terror
My friend Mohamed sent me the following email, and I quote:

Dear Friends,
 
 
Please find the attached letter/ appeal from Darfur war prisoners, that we received from
our friend Motasim. It's terrible and unbelievable. Please take a few minutes to read this appeal to
know how these prisoners and other Darfuris suffer from the Sudanese Regime. The National
Islamic Front Regime which was using it's new name: NCP, The National Congress Party of Omar
Al-bashir.
 
For those who received the letter twice, I apologise.
 
 
 
Thank you.
Mohamed Yahya.
 
 

 
A letter from JEM Prisoners of War in Khartoum to the UN Human Rights Rapporteur to Sudan


May 25th, 2009


Your Excellency, Dr. Sima Samar, the UN Human Rights Rapporteur to Sudan.


Greetings.


We very much thank you for visiting us in prison in and commend your work in Human Rights Issues in Sudan.  We, members of JEM and Prisoners of War in Kober Prison, Sudan, have been subjected to blatant breach of our rights as Prisoners of War.   We summarise our predicament in the following:


1.We are committed members of JEM and are in war against the government of Sudan (GoS). Taking arms against the government has never been our preference.  We have been forced into it because GoS has left us with no other choice.


2. In our struggle to secure our legitimate rights, we have invaded Khartoum, the very centre where decisions to bomb, rape and pillage Darfur are taken.


3. Khartoum is signatory to the Four Conventions of Geneva, one of whom concerns us as Prisoners of war.  In accordance with those Conventions, Khartoum is in direct breach of international laws regarding POW and Human Rights Statutes.


5. We convey to you that following our capture on or after May 10th 2009, the date of invasion of the National Capital by JEM we have been deprived of our human rights and subjected to horrific torture:


a) Captives were divided into two groups. The first group of 108 consisted of members of JEM who were taken to an unknown destination.  According to reliable information, members of this group have been subjected to mock trials prior to their summary execution.   We appeal to you to investigate the fate of this group as it constitutes one of the worst atrocities of recent time (names attached with original letter).


b ) A separate group of 15 members of JEM were executed in a firing squad at the White Nile, Ingaz Bridge on May 11th 2009.


c) The second group were taken into Military Prison of Omdurman and subjected to horrendous torture using electric shocks, whips, iron bars, dogs and sleep and water deprivation.  Five captives died of thirst in the Military Prison before the rest were taken to the Security HQ and later to Kober Prison between May 11th and May 18th 2009.


d) In addition to that, Prisoners were subjected to racist abuse targeting their ethnicity and regional origin.   Some of these prisoners were left thirsty for three days and later forced to drink their urine. 


e) After more than forty days of continuous torture, the captives were moved into so-called trials under Terrorism Act.  Prisoners were tortured to extract and record “confessions” later presented to the courts.  Recorded confessions were taken as evidence in court and defence lawyers were not permitted to challenge their legitimacy.  In a clear breach even of the Sudanese National legal System, laws under which the prisoners were convicted were enacted after invasion of Omdurman.


f) A total of 91 POWs were sentenced to death, including seven who suffer mental and psychiatric problems and have no connection with JEM.  Trials took place under a new Charter drafted by the Chief Justice.  The Charter prevailed over and contradicted higher sources of law including Sudan Transitional Constitution, 2005, Sudan Criminal Law, 1981 and Law of Evidence, 1983. All legal objections put forward by defence teams were rejected in favour of continuation of the fake trials.  Failing to secure legitimacy of the courts on Constitution grounds, the judges resorted to reference to Nurenburg trials as a guiding precedence for their legal process. 


g) Throughout the trials, the prosecutors relied on torture-extracted confessions and witnesses largely drawn from security personnel and others who were involved in torture.  Strangely enough, those who refused to make any confession under torture also received death sentences.


f) In Kober Prison, the captives were kept under conditions similar to those of the Nazi concentration camps.  More than 11 prisoners were kept in a cell of 2X3 squire meters of uneven floor.  Cells were badly ventilated, poorly lit and with each prisoner allowed to leave for toilet once every 24 hours only.  Later improvement introduced meant remaining in the cell for 22 hours a day and with only two short breaks for prayers a day. 


Absence of any health services was compounded by deliberate inclusion of others who suffer infectious diseases like TB and mental problems in the same cells.  Loud noise was pumped into cells are regular intervals.
297 prisoners were forced to share three toilets with each inmate given a single visit of a limited time per day.  Captives were kept in the same quarter allocated for prisoners awaiting execution and were forced to march in front of corpses of executed criminals.


Cells were regularly searched in a humiliating way and under supervision of the Ministry of Internal Affairs instead of the usual Prison authority. 


The POWs were kept in shackles welded directly on their legs causing severe injuries and burns in the process.


Your Excellency:


With all of the above, we appeal through your office for the following:


1. We appeal to the international community to exert pressure on the government of Sudan to meet its international obligations regarding respect of human rights and put an end to the current mass eradication in Darfur


2. We appeal to the international community to use its powers and force the government of Sudan to release JEM war prisoners and all those who have been detained or convicted in connection with Darfur conflict and in line with the Doha Good Will Agreement.


3. We appeal to the United Nations and the Human Rights Council to launch an independent forum to investigate the case of the 108 JEM prisoners whose fate remains unknown to this day.


4.  In the meantime and until all JEM prisoners are released, we appeal to you to ensure that those who are currently under detention are treated humanely and in line with international conventions.
 
Sincerely
JEM Prisoners of War in Kober Prison.


Comments (Page 1)
on Jun 04, 2009

I know... I know... it's not Guantanamo and the victims are not terrorists and they are black. So there won't be much of an outcry among liberals worried about human rights abuses.

Anyway, this is serious. And the only one who could do something is currently touring the middle east trying to make friends with the very governments who are doing this and granting concessions that those government's enemies (most prominently Israel) have to provide.

George Bush spoke up and acted for the Kurds.

Let Barack Obama, the African-American President, speak up and act for the Africans!

 

on Jun 04, 2009

I know... I know... it's not Guantanamo and the victims are not terrorists and they are black. So there won't be much of an outcry among liberals worried about human rights abuses.

Leauki, your presumptions make you a rather large arse, but, you know, whatever, do what you do.

I'll forward this to everyone that I know that would be interested.

~L

on Jun 04, 2009

Leauki, your presumptions make you a rather large arse

I agree that I might be totally wrong.

Perhaps there have been more and bigger demonstrations by liberals against the Sudanese government than against Guantanamo.

It just _looks_ to me as if liberals don't care about Africa.

But perhaps they do.

Tell me, where can I see them demonstrate for the people of Darfur? Where are those gigantic demonstrations against Arab nationalism and for the hundreds of thousands of Africans living in (and dying in) Darfur that DWARF the demonstrations FOR the few hundred terrorists held in Guantanamo?

I would LOVE, absolutely LOVE, to see liberals focus on REAL torture for once and stop defending terrorists. I would love it.

 

on Jun 04, 2009

We'll see whether there will be a major outcry over this.

I expect a demonstration in London any day now!

This will be great. If we put as much pressure on the Arab nationalists as on the US and Israel, perhaps we can make them stop torturing and murdering people.

I love liberals if they will be doing that!

 

on Jun 04, 2009

We'll see whether there will be a major outcry over this.

I expect a demonstration in London any day now!

This will be great. If we put as much pressure on the Arab nationalists as on the US and Israel, perhaps we can make them stop torturing and murdering people.

I love liberals if they will be doing that!

 

One can only hope that the saying, "Many voices can change the ears of the world," is true these days.

 

on Jun 04, 2009

I agree that I might be totally wrong.

 

The thing that pisses me off to no end is when people just flat label people for whatever stupid reason. They say that if it walks like a duck and talks like a duck, then it's a duck - but that's not always true. Bah! Especially when people take one look at me and label me. Granted, I know who I am, but still...it's bloody annoying.

on Jun 04, 2009

One can only hope that the saying, "Many voices can change the ears of the world," is true these days.

Perhaps. But I have only ever seen examples of this against powers that actually agreed to listen.

Most "voices" seem to speak up only against the innocent, where it is safe and the "voices" know that nothing will happen to them for "speaking up".

 

The thing that pisses me off to no end is when people just flat label people for whatever stupid reason.

Yes, me too. That's why I react so harshly when somebody retells a lie about Jews or Israel.

Either way, we will both see in a few days who was right here.

If liberals will start demonstrating against Arab nationalism, perhaps burn a few Arab flags, and wave flags of Israel and Darfurians tribes and others who in the middle east oppose Arab nationalism, I will admit that my characterisation of liberals as terrorist-loving racist anti-Semites was totally wrong.

But I put it to you that we will probably see another demonstration against Guantanamo or for Arab nationalism before we see liberals speak up against Arab nationalism and the Arabs' torture chambers.

Want to bet if I am wrong about this?

 

 

on Jun 04, 2009

If liberals will start demonstrating against Arab nationalism, perhaps burn a few Arab flags, and wave flags of Israel and Darfurians tribes and others who in the middle east oppose Arab nationalism, I will admit that my characterisation of liberals as terrorist-loving racist anti-Semites was totally wrong.

 

You can start admitting right now: me, my best friends, and a few others i know. (Though I do not consider myself liberal as in the mainstream liberals)

 

Perhaps. But I have only ever seen examples of this against powers that actually agreed to listen.

Most "voices" seem to speak up only against the innocent, where it is safe and the "voices" know that nothing will happen to them for "speaking up".

 

Mmm, we'll see. I would like to think that things can change, but look here at the USA.

on Jun 04, 2009

You can start admitting right now: me, my best friends, and a few others i know. (Though I do not consider myself liberal as in the mainstream liberals)

I didn't mean you.

But on the other hand, I don't remember seeing you speak up against Arab nationalism here on JU. In fact I only remember that you believe whatever their supporters tell you rather than apply even the tiniest bit of critical thinking.

You don't strike me as a great supporter of middle-eastern minorities.

But maybe you are different.

The vast majority of protesting liberals, however, I more often see protesting FOR Arab nationalism than AGAINST it, and AGAINST those who fight Arab nationalism, and FOR whatever terrorist group is the most fashionable one at the time.

I see American liberals trying to put more pressure on Israel now. I don't see them put more pressure on the Arabs.

Maybe it will change. But it currently looks as if American liberals are moving more towards supporting Arab nationalism and the terrorists rather than speaking up against them. I'm afraid it is more likely that more of these things will happen. America was the last country, besides Israel, to do anything about these things.

 

Mmm, we'll see. I would like to think that things can change, but look here at the USA.

If things have to _change_ for it to happen, doesn't that mean that I am _currently_ right?

We'll see how interested western liberals will be in torture when it happens to Africans rather than terrorists.

The genocide in Darfur has been going on for years, as has the civil war in Algeria. Both caused hundreds of thousands of deaths of innocent people.

But the only demonstrations I remember were those against Israel. What was the most common "legitimate criticism of Israeli policy" I saw on the posters? I am trying to remember... was it "re-open Auschwitz"?

 

on Jun 04, 2009

You don't strike me as a great supporter of middle-eastern minorities.

 

I'm a supporter of anyone that is in need, but I will call BS and be blunt when necessary - no matter who it is.

 

But on the other hand, I don't remember seeing you speak up against Arab nationalism here on JU. In fact I only remember that you believe whatever their supporters tell you rather than apply even the tiniest bit of critical thinking.

Well then you've not seen much of my comments then. I'm an equal opportunity person, lol. Seriously though, I'm not a fan of any fundamentalist form of anything; whether it be jewish stuff, arab stuff, etc. In fact, honestly, I admire Israel for lasting as long as it has. I even think it's quite amazing the capability they have with their military. I mean, c'mon seriously, six day war?!

 

So, again, nothing against Israel. I think the issue is that I need to pick my debates better, i.e. be in more ones about what Arab countries have done, etc.

on Jun 04, 2009

Well then you've not seen much of my comments then.  I'm an equal opportunity person, lol. Seriously though, I'm not a fan of any fundamentalist form of anything; whether it be jewish stuff, arab stuff, etc.

What does Jewish fundamentalism have to do with any of this?

I think if you ever went to Israel you might be surprised.

There is not much fundamentalism there. It's a country that recognises gay marriage, makes jokes about religion, a country in which a large number of the population is secular, atheist even. It's a country that has women and homosexuals in its army and had women ministers and prime ministers. It's a country where prostitution is legal.

In fact just a few weeks ago I met the supreme commander of the Israeli navy. He was famous at the time since just a few weeks earlier he was photographed coming out of a strip club.

There is a yearly gay pride parade in Jerusalem.

I think you might have a rather faulty idea of what Israel is if you think that any of it has to do with Jewish fundamentalism, unless you think that Jewish fundamentalism is about gay pride parades, homosexual soldiers, marriage between two men, and strip clubs. That's not my Judaism, I'm afraid.

 

In fact, honestly, I admire Israel for lasting as long as it has. I even think it's quite amazing the capability they have with their military. I mean, c'mon seriously, six day war?!

Thank you. I think you can easily understand why many people think that it was a miracle.

 

So, again, nothing against Israel. I think the issue is that I need to pick my debates better, i.e. be in more ones about what Arab countries have done, etc.

Perhaps.

At some point you might realise that picking on the one party in the middle east who have managed to stop the Arabs will not really help in the long run.

(Well, these days the Kurds are also pretty good. But for the longest time, Israel was the only place where the Arabs couldn't opress, torture and murder the non-Arab population. North-Africa, Sudan, Syria, and Iraq were not that lucky.)

Not that the Arabs and their allies in the UN are not trying to change this.

 

on Jun 04, 2009

What does Jewish fundamentalism have to do with any of this?

 

It was a general comment directed at those who just accept things without looking into, which thankfully I'm not one.

 

Thank you. I think you can easily understand why many people think that it was a miracle.

 

That, or good training, good technology, and good tactics.

 

 

on Jun 05, 2009

It was a general comment directed at those who just accept things without looking into, which thankfully I'm not one.

But you accepted the story you heard about Israel demolishing homes of innocent people for no reason.

And then it turned out that that happened in a battle as an alternative to bombing the area. Plus it was buildings in general, like police stations, and not family "homes" specifically.

I would say that that was an example of you just accepting things without looking into them.

(That's usually not a problem, but in the case of Jews or Israel, these stories become more and more exaggerated and finally someone decides to do something about it by killing a Jew or trying to kill several Jews. And this keeps the war going.)

 

That, or good training, good technology, and good tactics.

The Jordanian army was trained and equipped by the British. Israel's was made up of refugees who spent their lives building a country rather than training for war.

Much of the "good technology" the Israelis had was plainly stolen from the Arabs, during the war.

Ben Gurion once said that "in Israel, to be a realist, you have to believe in miracles". The world didn't expect the Jews to survive. (Not that the world ever really wanted them to survive. I mean, not even the US speak up against Arab calls for the death of all Jews. Rather Obama now refers to it as a legitimate grief. I wonder if the situation of the Darfuris is also a legitimate grief the Arabs have.)

 

on Jun 05, 2009

But you accepted the story you heard about Israel demolishing homes of innocent people for no reason.

And then it turned out that that happened in a battle as an alternative to bombing the area. Plus it was buildings in general, like police stations, and not family "homes" specifically.

I would say that that was an example of you just accepting things without looking into them.

 

Leauki, I did my research and found cases where it happened; end of story. We're obviously going to go around this point a few million times more, so lets just agree to disagree.

on Jun 05, 2009

Leauki, I did my research and found cases where it happened; end of story. We're obviously going to go around this point a few million times more, so lets just agree to disagree.

I saw the two examples you linked to. They didn't confirm your story.

I'm afraid anti-Semitism is just not something that I can agree to disagree with.

People get beaten up or even killed because other people believe the crap you happily retell. For you it's a academic exercise. For me it's a reason not to let people know what my religion is in a strange city.

If you cannot be swayed by calls to tell the truth, maybe you can be swayed by reminding you what the consequences are for other people, INCLUDING the same Arabs who are the victims of the conflict that will go on and on until those stories about the Jews and/or Israel stop being told.